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think the fiscal cliff uncertainty is going to continue t actually. so i'm a little more bearish in the near term. then i think it's a sell-off, if there is one, that should be bought aggressively for a rally in the end of 2013 that would be the beginning of a new bull market. >> when you say a rally towards the end of next year, do you think over the course of 2013 it's going to end higher? we're going to be higher than where we are right now? >> yeah, i mean, i think ultimately 2013 ends up higher at the end. i think we're going to go -- we're going to test some lower resistance in the first six, seven months of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much
to the 88-89 level. the fiscal cliff talks not going anywhere yet. during the next two weeks we will start to see some positive remarks. one thing that is very interesting, heat and oil settled in a very weak position. those two coming off could take the energy complex down much further. right now only 85 to 85.10. cheryl: we have plenty of supply out there right now. we are in the middle of winter. >> we have a tremendous amount of supply. we do not have much cold weather coming up near term. once the fiscal cliff starts getting resolved, you will see some buying going on. cheryl: bobby, i want to go back to you about europe. we have not had a lot of problees. seems like the greeks are kind to getting things. >> the last few days, europe markets have been pretty strong. as you said, a sleeping giant. cheryl: i do not want to see anything change. it has been nice. gentlemen, thank you. i appreciate it. great floor show today. uncertainty seems to be the norm in washington these days. last year you have the debt ceiling convey. congress had trouble putting together a deal. now the u.s. may
. that is it for us. have a great weekend, everyone. >> john: another weekend no, deal on the fiscal cliff. how close one is depends on whom you believe. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> john: good evening. i'm john roberts in for bret baier this evening. deadlock, gridlock, stalemate, whatever you call it. most people in washington seem to think we are there. we have just four more weekends to go before america goes over the most talked about piece ovate i of real estn the world, the fiscal cliff. ed henry tells us not everyone is pessimistic. >> reporter: literally snapping his fingers, vice president joe biden today suggested it will be easy to finish a deal with congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision is made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent middle class tax cut. the president would probably have me sprint up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. it can be done like that. it is not complicated. >> greg: speaker bane -- >> reporter: speaker john boehner not so optimistic. >> this is not a progress report, th
to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president that the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we will continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending3 problem, not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, i believe he has an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call. also, it has to be increases in rates for the wealthy or no deal. >> the phone call was pleasant, but more of the same. it is time for the president to be serious and come back with a counter offer. [inaudible question] >> the risk the president wants us to take, increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produce 60-70% of the new jobs in our country. that is the whole issue. [inaudible question] >> i think that is reckless talk. [inaudible question] >> listen, raising
it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the potential layoffs if we go over the cliff make these rearview numbers seem almost irrelevant to the market. hence the mixed performance of the averages today. sure, dow gained 81 points, but the s&p barely budged, edging up 29%. and the nasdaq actually declined .38%, led once again by the slip sliding away apple, which you know i like, but how many times during a particular show can i say i like it? so with that in mind, what's the game plan for next week? first off, perhaps the most important day of the week is monday. but not for any earnings. not for any releases. that's when we process the results of the weekend talk shows, which you now have to watch as if we were instead of watching, you know, colleg
. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has b
the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less social security and they pay more for their medicare? it meets the president's animus that we must get more mone
of job growth. a fiscal cliff go over -- >> snatching victory from the jaws. >> a superstorm. nothing can stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can it have no impact whatsoever? it seems curious to me. >> it does call into question whether these numbers c
on in town. in washington news, both parties hinting at renewed talks on the fiscal cliff. the acknowledgement of open lines of communication passed for encouraging news. a new survey finds more than 60% of leading investment professionals predict a shorp stock decline in the market if the government fails to come up with a deal. in this case defined as a more than 10% drop in the dow. 56% surveyed foresee a deal to avoid the cliff by year end, 44% predict failure in the ongoing negotiations. as for corporate america, through yesterday's close, there have been # 70 announcements of special dividends. these special difference deebds are valueded a more than $30.1 billion. among the latest names, mcgraw hill will pay a special dividends of $2.50 a share before year end. and drop its previously announced plan to buy back up to $200 million more of stock this year. >> everybody's paid their dividends this year, so they won't be paying them next year. >> this is a major issue. what's going to happen is -- we have two great economists onset. but that money will get annualized, s
different direction from the fiscal cliff and talk more about long-term and medium-term economic realities we face. in your written testimony to this committee, you warned against kicking the can down the road indefinitely because of the adverse effect that might have on the economy. the medium and long-term impact it might have. i thought your analysis was definitely something we need to pay attention to. as you observed in the failure to make progress in this area now could signal that we have bigger troubles ahead. the moody's analytics model that you used breaks down about 2028. the reason it does that because at that point, the interest on our national debt will start to cripple our economy. we will be left without much recourse. i'm not sure there is a tax increase on the planet that could suddenly fix that. i'm not sure we could print money fast enough. if we did, we would go the way of argentina. i tend to think of this medium and long term risk as the fiscal avalanche. the cliff is something we are approaching now and we can see where it is. we know will hit the cliff. the avalanc
of congress plus it puts the fiscal cliff and place right now and you lay it out i'm sorry, count me out. stacte want to take the first question? >> you raise a good point. this is where people's eyes glaze over. they can say whatever you want them to say. but the notion, i do think that there's been to the relationship between revenues and the titles and if we want to go bigger the better we need to push all of those, the smaller unit and the less you do on the other side, but there are some who say the idea of the american public is going to buy into this notion okay we are going to look devotees taxes go up so everything can be returned in a tax cut, and we go through this magical power. they are going to think 90% of the approval. so, you're going to have a general consensus. you do this year to get 500 of that in the interest savings alone. this should not be as challenging as it is. >> the other thing i would disagree about is the fact and i have been a huge jet kit and continue to be a huge advocate of tax reform debate and it's a critically important piece and i do think the noti
:00 eastern. john boehner makes remarks on the fiscal cliff. we will show you that when the happens. by now, a little bit more about the fiscal cliff. >> we turn our attention this morning about unemployment benefits and how insurance could back -- how insurance could be impacted. thank you for coming in. we want to start the discussion. when we're talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are we talking about here? >> unemployment insurance is the combination of federal and state programs. it usually lasts up to six weeks. it can be extended up to 93 weeks, depending on which they were in. it is this extension that we're really talking about as part of the fiscal cliff. >> that is what might be cut. that is what automatically expires. we know it cost $30 billion to continue additional unemployment benefits. of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. firm stand. we have seen in the past obama host: what specific benefits do guest: usually some kind of a cash benefit or they may help the search for a job. it is usually about $300 a week. it can vary from sta
on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. >> [applause] >> can she borrow your stool? >> this is my wife kim and here is the song we sing to our twin boys actually about two years ago we went in to sing them to sleep with this lull by and we got the guitar out and sat down on the side of the bed and we were about to play the opening cords and rough fuss looked up at me and said you know dad, we don't have to do this anymore. ♪ ♪ >> good buy and thank you very much. >> among the iletms on the agenda next week appointing members to a committee to hash out an agreement it was defense bill next year. the house planned to adjourn for the holidays next week but the house will be back in session december 17 to deal with the s
're fiscal cliff cliff fatigued to death. it's a real turnoff and we know it, but i want to address the issue in big picture terms with you because you're big picture thinker. i think at the end of the day we will have higher taxes on wealthy people, promises to cut spending somewhere down the road and don't worry about the debt, ignore it it. i think that's the outline of a big picture deal. what do you say? >> i sort of agree, stuart. there will be higher taxes. i do think the republicans will extract a couple of entitle reformat. a new way to calculate the cost of living adjustment and social security, maybe a higher payment by beneficiaries who are wealthier in medicare and finally the last point you make is the really intriguing one, that's the debt ceiling. and my hunch is the republicans will cave on taxes and they'll come back to fight again later in the winter on the debt ceiling and they could really extract major spending cuts by late winter. >> so you don't think the president will get the blank check that he wants, no debt ceiling? he wants no debt ceiling, you don't think he'll
move closer and closer to the fiscal cliff everyone will be keeping an eye out on a big deal or could we see a big tax hike. only three weeks before we possibly go over. david: wonder if we trade the guns to avoid a deal for the fiscal cliff. lauren: you're onto something. david: maybe. i don't think they would go for that. "money" with melissa francis is coming next. melissa: i'm melissa francis. here is what is money tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for exports and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing in the way though is president obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags on the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to nix them. guess who is behind it? my favorite chicago alderman. i say stop the madness. but alderman joe
the fiscal cliff and about further risks from eurozone financial crisis? go . >> we know the markets are driven on a minute by minute basis, but if we just step back from that, the chances that in two to three months from now, obviously we could briefly go over in january, i think that's unlikely, the chance that we'll really have the u.s. economy squeeze by 4%, 5% of gdp, i think it's incredibly unlikely. >> what are you assuming about the ongoing eurozone -- >> the eurozone, if we go through a series of ticks, we have had a lot of progress this year. you have to be clear about that. and not just with all the various government actions. look at wages in greece and now spain. wages in greece are down more than 25%. very painful, but we've heard about the pain already. what we haven't heard so much about is the competitiveness. >> enor husband costs with incredibly high unemployment rates. >> that i'm afraid is what's going on and that's extremely unpleasant. what i'm saying in terms of market action is we know about that, we're focused already on the unemployment, we're not focused o
energy with certainty, both seconds. despite the looming fiscal cliff, americans are focused as we say, on the to do list. what do you consider of a most pressing economic issues facing the united states today, jobs and unemployment far and away number one, 30%. followed by government spending, budget deficit at 15. then back to wages at 11. so 41% saying either wages or unemployment, and then you see the government spending peace. if you look at how this breaks out by republican and democrat, independent, independent and -- they rank jobs higher than wages. if you look at republicans they rank spending as a deficit. when you go back to this idea of compromise what are you compromising about? these are very tricky times in terms of creating a working coalition on that issue. compromise, consider the economic challenges facing the country, which of the following actions do you believe do most of the country improve over the next couple of years? we read three separate approaches to this. number one was growing the economy and creating jobs. even to investments, even if that means contin
of negotiations over what is called the fiscal cliff. also, don't forget to explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city of albany this weekend. book tv is on c-span2 and american history to be on c-span three. >> coming up at 7:00 c-span will be lot of discussion unskilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is sponsoring a bill to allow more highly skilled veterans and to the u.s. >> we have had these this the five explosions of knowledge in madison, but we have not coordinated care. all the services that we have end up having some any cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. we have to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? and income on a global level where we doing some times? and, of course, now we have to these reports saying 30 percent of everything we do may not be necessary in after. we will be step back, 30 percent of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures. this is something, i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the
things done. not limited to just worry about the debt and fiscal cliff and such. our program today just loosely, i'm welcoming you, obviously, joan walker's going the talk, ed reilly of sgi is going the give the polling results, and then ron brownstein of national journal is going to do our interview, and then we're going to have a panel discussion. so it's going to be a full and absolutely terrific day, i think. please, turn these babies off. and, again, welcome you. let me introduce joan walker. joan is executive vice president of allstate which is one of the country's largest insurance, we're in good hands with allstate, we all grew up with that. joan has been a terrific partner, in the last four years she's responsible for all corporate relations with allstate. prior to joining that company in 2005, she did similar work with monsanto and qwest. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist which, of course, in this town of washington is really all about. so, joan, thank you very much, and we want to welcome our friends here. [applause] >> good morning, and thank you so
sandy, and we have all of this debate going on over the fiscal cliff, that's driving us all crazy, right? >> yes, it is. >> and what it's also doing is that it has gotten the corporate seblgtor in a position where they're not vin investing. they're waiting to see what's happening. nonetheless, we're still creating jobs. if you take into consideration the fact that we have those things, those neglect factors in at the same time regenerating jobs, and that means that there's a significant potential for the economy to grow. >> is it possible that this whole debate and the fiscal cliff, whether or not we go over it or not, would bakt how many people are working the next year? >> it will definitely impact, but i think what the numbers are telling us and what we've seen for the last couple of months is that the affect will not be as great as most people are predicting. you know, we kind of got this y2k kifr syndrome that's going on. it will certainly have an affect, but it also means that we can -- we're in a position to really craft a real comprehensive way to -- >> are these good jobs? what
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)